salvation

Middle Day – #HolyWeek Saturday Haiku #NaPoWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

Middle day of three
First death claimed him, settling debts
By third, He was free

Day 15 of Na/GloPoWriMo2017 falls on Easter Saturday, and the NaPoWriMo.net challenge is to write a poem that reflects on the nature of being in the middle of something.

It is Fulfilled #Holy Week #Good Friday Tanka

The Scriptures fulfilled
Thirst quenched with wine vinegar
Never forsaken
Jesus took on the world’s sin
His life and mission, complete

Opportunity

Easter holidays,
Timely rescue from workplace –
Opportunity:
Refreshment and renewal,
Resurrection to new life!

written in response to today’s timely prompt at The Daily Post, with grateful thanks for a timely break from workplace torture – bring on the opportunity of renewal and a new life!

Follow the River’s Course

Caught in eddy pools
Swimming against life’s currents
Taken by the flow

Find the river’s course
As it flows through the desert
Oasis of life

written in response to this week’s prompt – “swim” – at Haiku Horizons

BOP #NaPiWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

B orn under a cloud
O vercast by fear and doubt –
P aradise awaits

Day 11 of Na/GloPoWriMo2017 presents a prompt challenge too far (for the moment) from NaPoWriMo.net: : the Bop. The invention of poet Afaa Michael Weaver, the Bop is a kind of combination sonnet + song. Like a Shakespearan sonnet, it introduces, discusses, and then solves (or fails to solve) a problem. Like a song, it relies on refrains and repetition. In the basic Bop poem, a six-line stanza introduces the problem, and is followed by a one-line refrain. The next, eight-line stanza discusses and develops the problem, and is again followed by the one-line refrain. Then, another six-line stanza resolves or concludes the problem, and is again followed by the refrain.

My acrostic haiku presents a problem, develops it, and provides the solution in rather fewer words.

Saul No More

Transfiguration,
Illuminating evil’s path:
The Light of the Son;
Led blindly, yet in full faith –
Saul no more, now apostle Paul

written in response to today’s prompt at The Daily Post, and inspired by Paul’s conversion as described in Acts 9

A King Comes #NaPoWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

See how your King shall come riding to you?
Not a warrior astride proud battle steed –
On a donkey’s foal as poor servants do;
Greeted with palm branches now freshly freed,
Upon dirt roads dressed with cloaks from the crowd;
Acclaimed heir to a hero king: his son,
“Hosanna!” called out deafeningly loud;
A week begins – Son’s duty to be done,
The cruellest week of all – when souls must be hard won

One of my favourite learning experiences from Na/GloPoWriMo2016 was the challenge of trying new forms of poetry which move us away from our personal preferences or comfort zones. For Day 9 of Na/GloPoWriMo2017, the official prompt at NaPoWriMo.net asked us to write a nine-line poem, for example as used by Sir Edmund Spenser when he wrote The Faerie Queene , using a nine-line form of his own devising. This poem uses that ‘Spenserian Stanza‘ – a rhyme scheme of a. b. a. b. c. d. c. d. d., employing Iambic Pentameter, with the last line in Iambic Hexameter with caesura.

The inspiration comes from Jesus’s ‘triumphal entry’ into Jerusalem, as told in the bible’s gospel of Matthew, at 21:1-11

Destiny Beckons

Destiny beckons
En route to Jerusalem
Eternity waits
History as prophesied
For the sake of mankind’s souls

Jesus comes to Jerusalem as king
The next day the great crowd that had come for the festival
heard that Jesus was on his way to Jerusalem.
They took palm branches and went out to meet him, shouting,
‘Hosanna!’
‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!’
‘Blessed is the king of Israel!’
Jesus found a young donkey and sat upon it, as it is written:
‘Do not be afraid, Daughter Zion;
    see, your king is coming,
    seated on a donkey’s colt.’
At first his disciples did not understand all this.
Only after Jesus was glorified
did they realise that these things had been written about him
and that these things had been done to him.

– John 12:12-16

He Bore our Sins

He bore our sins
On his own body,
Upon the cross
By his manifold wounds;
That we may be healed,
He died man’s death;
Yet victorious arose
That we might live again;
Cleansed, renewed in faith, and
Cloaked in His righteousness.

written in response to today’s prompt at The Daily Post, and inspired by 1 Peter 2:24

Revelation Convicts

False comfort in the crowd
Who disown their Father
Revelation convicts
The heart as an outlier
Welcomed then into the fold
To become a branch
of the one True Vine
Adopted to inheritance
In the royal throne room

written in response to today’s prompt at The Daily Posttoday’s prompt at The Daily Post