remembrance

Remember the Fallen

Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge

Oh say can you see
The flag of a proud nation
Fallen to half-mast

Star-spangled banner
Fly free again o’er that land
The home of the brave

written in response to this week’s prompt in Ronovan Writes weekly haiku challenge for friends in the USA

The Bread and the Wine #NaPoWriMo2016 #GloPoWriMo2016

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The bread and the wine,
Reverently consumed,
So we never forget
Your death made us room
In the kingdom of heaven,
In the house of the Father,
With the angelic host
Singing praise to the Master.
In the cup, on a plate,
Simple elements combine
To mark Your victory:
Broken bread, poured-out wine.

An old favourite of mine, originally posted in January 2014, and brought out for Day Six of the National Poetry Writing Month challenge – to write a poem about food . . . so why not the Lord’s Supper?

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‘In Flanders Field’ by John McCrae

'Poppy Fields' by Christine Speck

‘Poppy Fields’ by Christine Speck

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

– by John McCrae, May 1915

dedicated to the people of Brussels with sympathy and prayers for the injured and bereaved

Blessed are those who mourn,
for they will be comforted.
Blessed are the meek,
for they will inherit the earth.
Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness,
for they will be filled.
Blessed are the merciful,
for they will be shown mercy.
Blessed are the pure in heart,
for they will see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers,
for they will be called children of God.
Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

– Matthew 5:4-10

We Will Remember

We will remember
The blood shed for us
For our freedom
For peace
For mercy and justice
For hope for the future
For us, and for ours
We will remember

Blood Shed

Poppy Fields

Enough bloodshed.

Calvary

His blood shed is enough.

“Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid.”
– John 14:27

‘For the Fallen’ by Robert Laurence Binyon

Poem by Robert Laurence Binyon (1869-1943), published in The Times newspaper on 21st September 1914.

Tower of London Poppies 2014

With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill: Death august and royal
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres.
There is music in the midst of desolation
And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;
They sit no more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They sleep beyond England’s foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,
Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,
Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain,
As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,
To the end, to the end, they remain.

#FF @PoppyLegion ‘Follow Friday’ Haiku – #WeShallRememberThem

'Poppy Fields' by Christine Speck

‘Poppy Fields’ by Christine Speck

Let we who live on,
Commemorate the fallen –
Honour their courage

Care for their loved ones
Stand by vet’rans who return –
Make a better world

dedicated to the men and women of the armed forces, who have defended us so bravely, in anticipation of the UK’s remembrance Sunday on 9th November, and Armistice Day on 11th November

‘Chanson d’Automne’ (‘Autumn Song’) by Paul Verlaine

In preparation for the D-Day Landings in Normandy on 6th June 1944, Operation Overlord, the BBC had signalled to the French Resistance that the opening lines of the 1866 Verlaine poem “Chanson d’Automne” were to indicate the start of the D-Day operations. The first three lines of the poem, “Les sanglots longs / des violons / de l’automne” (“The long sobs of autumn violins”), meant that Operation Overlord was to start within two weeks. These lines were broadcast on 1st June 1944. The next set of lines, “Blessent mon coeur / d’une langueur / monotone” (“wound my heart with a monotonous languor”), meant that it would start within 48 hours and that the resistance should begin sabotage operations especially on the French railroad system; these lines were broadcast on 5th June at 23:15 GMT.

As we approach the 70th anniversary of D-Day, let us remember those who bravely assaulted the beaches codenamed ‘Omaha’, ‘Utah’, ‘Gold’, ‘Juno’ and ‘Sword’, and especially those who fell on both sides.

Les sanglots longs
Des violons
De l’automne
Blessent mon cœur
D’une langueur
Monotone.

Tout suffocant
Et blême, quand
Sonne l’heure,
Je me souviens
Des jours anciens
Et je pleure

Et je m’en vais
Au vent mauvais
Qui m’emporte
Deçà, delà,
Pareil à la
Feuille morte.

The long sobs
Of the violins
Of Autumn
Wound my heart
With a monotonous
Languor.

All choked
And pale, when
The hour chimes,
I remember
Days of old
And I cry

And I’m going
On an ill wind
That carries me
Here and there,
As if a
Dead leaf.

– Paul Verlaine