America

Come the Fall

“My people, hear the words I say:
Do not fear that throaty itch;
Sure unemployment’s just a glitch;
Come my Fall it can go away…

Batting two thousand ev’ry day,
Bad things don’t stop each perfect call –
It’s never me who drops the ball;
All the problems people fear
Could magically disappear…”
Come bring on the November Fall

Written following Ronovan’s Weekly Decima Challenge on RonovanWrites – #4 “Itch”

The Elephant in the Room

Initially made me mad
Don’t believe a word ever said
Indistinguished, morally dead,
Oblivious, ignorant, sad;
Trolling any outing the bad,
In a country riddled with lies,
No guilt by those feeding the cries;
The dumb elephant in the room –
His base chanting the ballots’ doom,
Even as the flag sags, hope tries…

White wrinkles around vacant eyes,
His head a ridiculous plume
In truth’s spotlight will squirm and fume;
The bruised ego of absurd size
Ever fooled “love” not money buys
House sub-let by some guy named ‘Vlad’
Overseeing each faked attack ad;
Underhand and avarice-led,
So before democracy’s dead,
Elect Dumbo? You must be mad…

Written following Ronovan’s Weekly Decima Challenge on RonovanWrites – #3 “Mad” – a gymnastic variation double decima with a reverse and a twist.

President Ronald Reagan on Religious Intolerance

“Let me speak plainly: the United States of America is and must remain a nation of openness to people of all beliefs. Our very unity has been strengthened by this pluralism. That’s how we began; this is how we must always be. The ideals of our country leave no room whatsoever for intolerance, anti-Semitism, or bigotry of any kind – none. The unique thing about America is a wall in our Constitution separating church and state. It guarantees there will never be a state religion in this land, but at the same time it makes sure that every single American is free to choose and practice his or her religious beliefs or to choose no religion at all. Their rights shall not be questioned or violated by the state.

Remarks at the International Convention of B’nai B’rith, 6 September 1984”

― Ronald Reagan

President John F. Kennedy on Religious Intolerance

“For while this year it may be a Catholic against whom the finger of suspicion is pointed, in other years it has been, and may someday be again, a Jew–or a Quaker–or a Unitarian–or a Baptist. It was Virginia’s harassment of Baptist preachers, for example, that helped lead to Jefferson’s statute of religious freedom. Today I may be the victim- -but tomorrow it may be you–until the whole fabric of our harmonious society is ripped at a time of great national peril.

Finally, I believe in an America where religious intolerance will someday end–where all men and all churches are treated as equal–where every man has the same right to attend or not attend the church of his choice–where there is no Catholic vote, no anti-Catholic vote, no bloc voting of any kind–and where Catholics, Protestants and Jews, at both the lay and pastoral level, will refrain from those attitudes of disdain and division which have so often marred their works in the past, and promote instead the American ideal of brotherhood.

That is the kind of America in which I believe. And it represents the kind of Presidency in which I believe–a great office that must neither be humbled by making it the instrument of any one religious group nor tarnished by arbitrarily withholding its occupancy from the members of any one religious group. I believe in a President whose religious views are his own private affair, neither imposed by him upon the nation or imposed by the nation upon him as a condition to holding that office.

This is the kind of America I believe in–and this is the kind I fought for in the South Pacific, and the kind my brother died for in Europe. No one suggested then that we may have a “divided loyalty,” that we did “not believe in liberty,” or that we belonged to a disloyal group that threatened the “freedoms for which our forefathers died.”
― John F. Kennedy