poetry

I, Weary Traveller

Each day pens more detail
In the story of my life
Its ups and its downs
Its trivia and melodrama
Yet I hold no power
As an author’s quill does
No choice as the reader might exert
Unable to skip chapters
Or jump to the epilogue
I journey slowly through the story
Weary burdened traveller,
Stepping from page to page
Annotating the facts of the past
With no foresight of future lines

The NaPoWriMo.net challenge for Day 29 of Na/GloPoWriMo2017 was to take one of your favorite poems and find a very specific, concrete noun in it; then spend five minutes free-writing associations – other nouns, adjectives, etc. and use your original word and the results of your free-writing as the building blocks for a new poem.

I drew the word ‘traveller’ from one of my favourite poems, ‘The Listeners’ by Walter de la Mere.

‘Father’ by Edgar A. Guest

My father knows the proper way
The nation should be run;
He tells us children every day
Just what should now be done.
He knows the way to fix the trusts,
He has a simple plan;
But if the furnace needs repairs,
We have to hire a man.

My father, in a day or two
Could land big thieves in jail;
There’s nothing that he cannot do,
He knows no word like “fail.”
“Our confidence” he would restore,
Of that there is no doubt;
But if there is a chair to mend,
We have to send it out.

All public questions that arise,
He settles on the spot;
He waits not till the tumult dies,
But grabs it while it’s hot.
In matters of finance he can
Tell Congress what to do;
But, O, he finds it hard to meet
His bills as they fall due.

It almost makes him sick to read
The things law-makers say;
Why, father’s just the man they need,
He never goes astray.
All wars he’d very quickly end,
As fast as I can write it;
But when a neighbor starts a fuss,
‘Tis mother has to fight it.

In conversation father can
Do many wondrous things;
He’s built upon a wiser plan
Than presidents or kings.
He knows the ins and outs of each
And every deep transaction;
We look to him for theories,
But look to ma for action”
― Edgar A. Guest

The Wall Crumbles Still #NaPoWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

Of history’s walls
None proved more ineffective
Save to rally mobs

Obsolete as built
Unfit for useful purpose
Divisive folly

The wall crumbles still
Allegorical symbol
Relic of its age

For Day 26 of Na/GloPoWriMo2017, NaPoWriMo.net challenges us to consider what future archaeologists, whether human or from alien civilization, will make of us? Today’s poems should seek answer that question, exploring a particular object or place from the point of view of some far-off, future scientist.

Made in God’s Image

Made in God’s image
A likeness of life’s Author
Creative by Word
Sculptor of reality
Envisions eternity

a partner piece to my earlier response to the Day 25 Na/GloPoWriMo2017 prompt at NaPoWriMo.net

Grey Matter

Inspired grey matter
Displays creative nature
By Divine design

written in response to today’s prompt at The Daily Post.

I’m English by the way. We spell it, “grey”.

Within my Mind #NaPoWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

All of time and space
Can exist within my mind
Imagination
Unbound creativity
Untold possibility

The Day 25 Na/GloPoWriMo NaPoWrimo.net challenge is to write a poem that explores a small, defined space – it could be your childhood bedroom, or the box where you keep old photos. It could be the inside of a coin purse or the recesses of an umbrella stand. Any space will do – so long as it is small, definite, and meaningful to you.

The Beasts of Caerbannog #NaPoWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

The most foul, cruel,
Bad-tempered rodents
Any knight ever set eyes upon;
These rabbits had a vicious streak a mile wide:
Born killers!
Baring huge, sharp . . . ,
Able to leap about . . . ,
Behold the strewn bones!
Enter their realm, trembling,
Besmirched with fear . . .
Then, run away!

Day 24 of Na/GloPoWriMo and today’s NaPoWriMo.net challenge is to write a poem of ekphrasis — that is, a poem inspired by a work of art. The additional challenge was to base the poem on a very particular kind of art – the marginalia of medieval manuscripts. This quadrille poem (44 words) draws on the images displayed which seem to have featured in the margins of bibles, and is inspired by the art of Terry Gilliam, and a scene from one of my favourite films of all time, Monty Python and The Holy Grail.

Ni.

St George’s Day #NaPoWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

George
No knight
Certainly not English
No slayer of dragons
Myth

George
A saint
Born in Lydda
Martyred for his faith
Truth

For Day 23 of Na/GloPoWriMo, Gloria Gonsalves provides the NaPoWriMo.net challenge – to write a double elevenie. It was suggested that it might be fun to try to write the double elevenie based on two nouns that are opposites, like sun and moon, or mountain and sea.

This second effort was inspired by today being the day we remember George, patron saint of England. You can read more about his story here.

An elevenie is an eleven-word poem of five lines, with each line performing a specific task in the poem. The first line is one word, a noun. The second line is two words that explain what the noun in the first line does, the third line explains where the noun is in three words, the fourth line provides further explanation in four words, and the fifth line concludes with one word that sums up the feeling or result of the first line’s noun being what it is and where it is. A double elevenie would have two stanzas of five lines each, and twenty-two words in all.

Fear and Faith #NaPoWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

Fear
A thief
Accomplice of doubt
Stealing away from me
Resignation

Faith
A gift
Given by grace
Saving me from myself
Affirmation

For Day 23 of Na/GloPoWriMo, Gloria Gonsalves provides the NaPoWriMo.net challenge – to write a double elevenie. It was suggested that it might be fun to try to write the double elevenie based on two nouns that are opposites, like sun and moon, or mountain and sea.

An elevenie is an eleven-word poem of five lines, with each line performing a specific task in the poem. The first line is one word, a noun. The second line is two words that explain what the noun in the first line does, the third line explains where the noun is in three words, the fourth line provides further explanation in four words, and the fifth line concludes with one word that sums up the feeling or result of the first line’s noun being what it is and where it is. A double elevenie would have two stanzas of five lines each, and twenty-two words in all.