Day: 23/04/2017

Be Avid in Faith

Be avid in faith
A persistent disciple
Fervent in prayer

written in response to today’s prompt at The Daily Post

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St George’s Day #NaPoWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

George
No knight
Certainly not English
No slayer of dragons
Myth

George
A saint
Born in Lydda
Martyred for his faith
Truth

For Day 23 of Na/GloPoWriMo, Gloria Gonsalves provides the NaPoWriMo.net challenge – to write a double elevenie. It was suggested that it might be fun to try to write the double elevenie based on two nouns that are opposites, like sun and moon, or mountain and sea.

This second effort was inspired by today being the day we remember George, patron saint of England. You can read more about his story here.

An elevenie is an eleven-word poem of five lines, with each line performing a specific task in the poem. The first line is one word, a noun. The second line is two words that explain what the noun in the first line does, the third line explains where the noun is in three words, the fourth line provides further explanation in four words, and the fifth line concludes with one word that sums up the feeling or result of the first line’s noun being what it is and where it is. A double elevenie would have two stanzas of five lines each, and twenty-two words in all.

Fear and Faith #NaPoWriMo2017 #GloPoWriMo2017

Fear
A thief
Accomplice of doubt
Stealing away from me
Resignation

Faith
A gift
Given by grace
Saving me from myself
Affirmation

For Day 23 of Na/GloPoWriMo, Gloria Gonsalves provides the NaPoWriMo.net challenge – to write a double elevenie. It was suggested that it might be fun to try to write the double elevenie based on two nouns that are opposites, like sun and moon, or mountain and sea.

An elevenie is an eleven-word poem of five lines, with each line performing a specific task in the poem. The first line is one word, a noun. The second line is two words that explain what the noun in the first line does, the third line explains where the noun is in three words, the fourth line provides further explanation in four words, and the fifth line concludes with one word that sums up the feeling or result of the first line’s noun being what it is and where it is. A double elevenie would have two stanzas of five lines each, and twenty-two words in all.

A Year in Proverbs – 6:16-19

There are six things the Lord hates,
seven that are detestable to him:
        haughty eyes,
        a lying tongue,
        hands that shed innocent blood,
        a heart that devises wicked schemes,
        feet that are quick to rush into evil,
        a false witness who pours out lies
        and a person who stirs up conflict in the community.